Category Archives: Writing

NEW HOME for Hued Unorthodoxy!

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Dear WordPress,

You’ve served me for two years, and, for the most part, I’ve been happy. We’ve certainly had our share of good times and we’ve managed to create some meaningful memories. However, it’s time for us to part. No, this is not the death of my blogging career. But, yes, I’ve found a better blog host that’s easier for me to use and doesn’t challenge my technologically-challenged self quite so much.

In other words, don’t worry.

It’s not you. It’s me. 

Alvida. 

~JP

Everyone, from now on, please visit Hued Unorthodoxy on its NEW host:

Click the picture.

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Lazy & Computerless

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I should probably … you know, like … write something? Right?

Perhaps once I get a new computer. Which will happen in just a few days. Hooray!

I gotta say, I do rather miss my writing sessions at Cafe Ladro. Once I possess that new MacBook, I think a trip to my favorite coffee shop will be in order.

Until then, here’s a lovely (and by “lovely” I mean awkwardly fun) picture of my co-workers and me  from a recent trip to San Diego:

Yes, that’s right. That’s how we in the Admissions Office at NU roll!

April = National Poetry Month

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Did you know that April is National Poetry Month? I had no idea until tonight, but I’m sure glad I found out!

If you read my last blog, then you are aware that, as of late, I have been struggling quite seriously with my creativeness. And, to elaborate a bit further on my thoughts from last night, I think part of my problem is my tendency to subconsciously believe the misconception that ‘true’ or ‘pure’ creativity and inspiration can only happen organically and never as a result of one’s deliberate intentionality. However, a fellow artist and friend of mine, after reading my last blog, said something to me that really hit home; it’s nothing I haven’t heard before, but it was definitely the reminder I needed: “…sometimes,” she said, “you have to be really purposeful and specific about creativity.”

Words of wisdom, those are! Thank you, Michelle!

It’s true, though, how we succumb to this belief that something isn’t really creative if we’ve created it through a scheduled and/or disciplined agenda. Somehow – and I have no idea why this is – in our minds, spontaneity becomes synonymous with true creativity.

But the two ideas are not synonymous, as Michelle pointed out. One can tap into her fullest potential and create something that’s true and meaningful and authentic while also being deliberate and completely strategic about it. Jeez, I, of all people, should know this! I’m a pianist!! Sure, the gruelingly long hours at the keys, practicing scales and arpeggios and the like can suck, but when you put everything together and apply the technicalities to, say, Liszt’s “Gnomenreigen”, the pieces all fall into place; and suddenly you find yourself effortlessly playing a highly creative, highly genuine masterpiece. A song. Not simply a series of complex notes and rhythms.

My point? You don’t just wake up one day and play a Liszt piece. You practice. And practice. And PRACTICE! Day after day, note by note, one fragmented measure at a time – for hours and hours and hours! Until a work of art is born. Now if that’s not an example of intentional, disciplined artistry, then I’m not sure what is!

All that to say, Michelle is right. Being specific and purposeful is key.

And that’s precisely where National Poetry Month comes in. First of all, I love poetry. And, for whatever reason, I’ve always enjoyed writing poetry more than I have prose (even though I think I’m actually better at the latter). Some of you know that I attempted National Novel Writing Month last year and failed miserably. Regardless, I think a specific plan and focus will help me get back on track with my writing, and the thought of writing (or reading) poetry for thirty days excites me far more than the idea of writing a shitty novel in a month.

Thus, I’m committing myself to a one-month poetry writing/reading/sharing challenge. For the entire month of April, I will attempt to interact with as much poetry as I can, whether it be original poetry that I’ve written myself or simply another poet’s work(s) that I read (and then share with my blog readers). After all, in any genre of literature, to be a good writer is to be a good reader first. Right?

So…let the poetry writing & reading begin!

[And just for kicks, check out this video of an 8-year-old who plays “Gnomenreigen” better than most adults probably ever will. Wowza! CLICK HERE.]

Echoed Promises

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Today:
Anonymous potentiality.

Today:
It may determine the rest of my life
Or at least the immediate tomorrow.

“Behold,” I say, echoing Jeremiah in his youth,
“I do not know how to speak.”

But in the quiet darkness, I hear a voice—
A familiar voice.

He, as usual, is silently loud, and
His words reverberate an ancient promise:
“Do not say, ‘I am a youth,’” He says,
“Because everywhere I send you, you shall go,
“And all that I command you,
You shall speak.
Do not be afraid of them,
“For I am with you.”

Today I rest
With touched lips.

30 Days Later

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It’s the end of the month, which means it’s time for me to report my results on NaNoWriMo. But the truth is, I have very little to tell you, since I kinda, sorta gave up on the whole thing. Heh. ‘Tis what happens when you jump into a giant project like that without an actual plan. A few days and 5,000 words into it, I realized I had zero motivation to keep going. But you know what? I don’t consider this a complete defeat. I now have a whole year to think through this, and in doing that, I hope to develop a clearer, more tactical plan for next year. Besides, at the end of the day 5,000 words are better than 0, right? So here’s to next year, and here’s to progress – even if it’s only in the form of a whisper.